Monday, September 2, 2013

Phygelius


Phygelius consists of two species, capensis and aequalis, both of which are found in summer rainfall areas of Natal and the eastern Cape.  They have been crossed to create a variety of hybrids, all of which are pretty much cold hardy in the NYC area.  In mild winters they may not fully die back, in rougher winters they do die back then resprout.  They can sucker in some cases, and flower for a long period of time.   I have planted several cvs in the school garden, some are big, others still small in their second year, it seems the size of the plant I started with does affect how fast they grew (they came from different sources).  They can be propagated by cuttings and are a favorite of hummingbirds.  
I also want to announce a new forum, created by Jonathan Mejia and myself (well Jonathan is really the technical wiz behind the forum's workings, I'm less computer literate having not grown up with them) for South African plant aficionados who want to grow them in temperate zones (Z7 and lower).  Check it out at http://zone7southafrica.proboards.com/

3 comments:

James Jones said...

Looking through an old Veld & Flora (3/88) I came across an article by Ernest T. DeMarie III about South African plants in America (with a letter by me as an addendum!) I assume you are that person.
I have continued my interest in SA species to the extent of recently publishing a book, 'Fall and Winter Bloom in the Solar Greenhouse', (available from Amazon), for which they have been a mainstay.
I'm always looking for new plants and information and would enjoy corresponding with you to compare what we know.
I live in Lexington, MA.
James L. Jones

James Jones said...

Looking through an old Veld & Flora (3/88) I came across an article by Ernest T. DeMarie III about South African plants in America (with a letter by me as an addendum!) I assume you are that person.
I have continued my interest in SA species to the extent of recently publishing a book, 'Fall and Winter Bloom in the Solar Greenhouse', (available from Amazon), for which they have been a mainstay.
I'm always looking for new plants and information and would enjoy corresponding with you to compare what we know.
I live in Lexington, MA.
James L. Jones

geranios said...

Yep, I'm Ernie, and I did write that article right around the time I was doing my doctorate at Cornell on tissue culturing pelargonium luridum and other species (and making some cool hybrids via tc as well) at that time. Are you on facebook?